Wittier Word Weavers

Writers' Club of Whittier

The Chick Sexer – A Novel Education by Sherry Novak

8 Comments

Chick sexer – what’s that? I enjoy watching expressions when I tell people what 101-year-old Frankie used to do for a living. He squeezed day-old chicks to determine their gender. I’ve heard Frankie’s stories, sometimes hilarious, sometimes tragic, for the thirty years I’ve been his ballroom dance teacher. All the time I thought: Someone needs to get this little known and soon-to-be-lost slice of Japanese American history down on paper. And so, three years ago I set to work writing the novel entitled The Chick Sexer. Creating the story of the fictionalized Frankie Honda has been an education!

Places like the Japanese American National Museum in L.A. and the Densho website have done a great job of documenting short pieces of oral histories. But how did it feel to be a young Nisei, second generation born in America, man in the 1920’s, 30’s and 40’s? Kids who played baseball, watched Charlie Chaplin films and built their own boards with skates on them; teenagers who learned to box, drove Model T Fords and danced the Lindy hop were soon to be viewed as the enemy. What happened between the time they were born of Issei, first-generation, parents and the bombing of Pearl harbor?

How to start the process of writing a historical novel? Along with collecting vignettes from the real Frankie, I asked him a million questions over lunch, every Tuesday. I started soaking up movies from the 1920’s-40’s, both American and Japanese. (Hulu has a large selection of old Japanese movies, however, quite a few, annoyingly, stopped about three-quarters of the way through. Slow internet?) I learned that, next to Hollywood, Japan had one of the most prolific film industries in the early 1900’s. Sadly, many classic moving pictures were lost during the great Kanto earthquake of 1923. Frankie told me that in Little Tokyo, Los Angeles, and Japan the silent movies always had benshi. The narrator stood on stage next to the film voicing man and lady’s roles as well as adding explanations. Sometimes they threw in jokes or improvised new dialogue. They were as famous as the actors and rode up and down the west coast in limousines. Japan continued making silent movies even after talkies come out, because their patrons so enjoyed the narrators. Producer Akira Kurosawa’s brother was a famous benshi. Keeping the art form alive, a lady narrator named Midori Sawato performs today as a benshi.

Part I, to be continued . . .

Advertisements

Author: Sherry Novak

Sherry Novak's novel 'The Chick Sexer' will soon be released.

8 thoughts on “The Chick Sexer – A Novel Education by Sherry Novak

  1. “Chick sexer – what’s that? ” — Great intro! Love it! Makes me want to read about Frankie and his generation—like I haven’t been there.

  2. Fabulous summation and background, Sherry. Keep it coming!

    Sent from my iPad

    >

  3. Sounds quite interesting, Sherry. I love to learn history through good fiction as well as through biographies. I guess it will be in the book, but I’m still wondering how a chick sexer can distinguish male from female chicks by squeezing them.

  4. Yes, it is in the book, Claire, but here’s the short version. They had to turn the chick upside down holding the feet between two fingers and gently open the cloaca (or vent) to observe tiny bumps or not. After much experience, really good sexers could discern the gender of 1000-1200 chicks an hour with 98% accuracy. They sometimes sexed over 24 hours straight. Frankie told me their beverage of choice was strong coffee and Coca-Cola mixed together. I’ve been meaning to try it!

  5. Thanks for added light on your novel. I’m dying to read it from start to finish.

  6. Thanks, Iris. Soon, very soon. I’m tweaking as I get comments back from beta readers.

Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s